UNC at APSA 2016 in Philadelphia

More than 50 UNC-affiliated scholars — including two faculty members, one graduate student and one alumna from the UNC School of Media and Journalism — will present authored or co-authored papers or research posters, as well as receive honors and serve as moderators, discussants and panelists at the 2016 American Political Science Association (APSA) Annual Meeting and Exhibition. This conference will take place Sept. 1-4, 2016, in Philadelphia.

This year’s theme is “Great Transformations: Political Science and the Big Questions of Our Time.”

UNC MJ-school faculty and student activities at APSA 2016 include:

  • Daniel Kreiss, Adam Saffer, Jennifer Harker (Ph.D. student) and Kylah Hedding (Ph.D. '16) will present “A Network Analysis of the Production of Campaign Communication in a Digital Age.”
  • Daniel Kreiss, Shannon McGregor (Texas) and Regina Lawrence (Oregon) will present “Instastyleď: Campaign Communication in the Selfie Era.”
  • Daniel Kreiss will participate in “The Past, Present, and Future of Digital Politics Research: A Roundtable.”

Other Carolina faculty and student activities include:  

  • Brigitte Seim (UNC Department of Public Policy) won the Comparative Politics Award.
  • Jonathan Weiler (UNC Curriculum in Global Studies) and Marc Hetherington (Vanderbilt) won the Elections, Public Opinion and Voting Behavior Award for “Authoritarianism and Polarization in American Politics.”
  • Peter J. Mucha (Department of Mathematics), Skyler Cranmer (Ohio) and Elizabeth Menninga (Iowa) won the Political Networks (Political Ties) for “Kantian fractionalization predicts the conflict propensity of the international system.”
  • Claire Greenstein (UNC Department of Political Science) and Paula Mukherjee (UNC Department of Political Science) will present the poster, “Reparations after Human Rights Violations: The Role of Violence.”
  • Andrew Tyner (UNC Department of Political Science) will present the poster, “Creating Complexity: Opinion Leaders’ Efforts to Activate the Status Quo Bias.”
  • Eric Hansen (UNC Department of Exercise and Sport Science) will present the poster, “Representation and Electoral Systems Constituency Diversity, Representation, and Polarization in State Legislatures.”
  • Frank Baumgartner (UNC Department of Political Science) will lead the APSA Short Course, “Database and Website Development for Public Policy: The Comparative Policy Agendas Project.”
  • Layna Mosley (UNC Department of Political Science) will help lead the discussion, “Political Economy of Sovereign Risk.”
  • Daniel Gustafson (UNC Department of Political Science) and Stephen Gent (UNC Department of Political Science) will present “Military Intervention and Opposition Group Fragmentation in Civil Conflict.”
  • Rebecca Kreitzer (UNC Department of Public Policy) will lead discussion Race, Ethnicity, and Politics (Descriptive Representation)
  • Jeff Spinner-Halev (UNC Department of Philosophy) will present “Social Equality in a Market Society.”  
  • Brice Acree (UNC Department of Political Science) is the chair for and will lead discussion on the panel, “Coding and Validating Political Event Data.”  
  • Liesbet Hooghe (UNC Department of Political Science) and Gary Marks (UNC Department of Political Science) will present “Breaking News: Taking Stock of the Brexit Shock.”
  • Rashaan Maxwell (UNC Department of Political Science) will serve as the chair for “Categorical Precision in the Study of Immigrant Integration” and will present “How Should We Understand Immigrant Integration in Europe?”
  • Anna Bassi (UNC Department of Political Science) will present “Policy Preferences in Coalition Formation: Minority, and Surplus Governments.”
  • Lucy Martin (UNC Department of Political Science) will present “Strategic Taxation and Corruption by Rent Seeking Governments.”
  • Layna Mosley (UNC Department of Political Science), Sarah Brooks (Ohio) and Raphael Cunha (Ohio) will present “Risk and Uncertainty in Emerging Market Debt.”
  • Evelyne Huber (UNC Department of Political Science), John Stephens (UNC Department of Political Science) and Jingjing Huo (University of Waterloo) will present “Politics, Markets, and Top Income Shares.”
  • Rahsaan Maxwell (UNC Department of Political Science) will lead the discussion, “Economic and Political Integration of Immigrants in Europe.”
  • Kelsey Shoub (UNC Department of Political Science), Andrew Tyner (UNC Department of Political Science) and Brice Acree (UNC Department of Political Science) will present “Issue Agendas in Television Media.”
  • Brice Acree (UNC Department of Political Science) will present “Deep-Learning Methods for Analyzing Political Language.”
  • Jason M. Roberts (UNC Department of Political Science) and Erik Engstrom (UC Davis) will present “How Parties Construct Democracy: Ballot Law Changes in the US.”
  • Pamela Johnston Conover (UNC Department of Political Science), Kelsey Shoub (UNC Department of Political Science), Amy Sentementes (UNC Department of Political Science) and Leah Christiani (UNC Department of Political Science) will present the paper, “How Powerful a Presence? Women as Sources in Television News.”
  • Hsuan-Wei Lee (Department of Mathematics) and Huan-Kai Tseng (George Washington University) will present the paper, “Partner Switching in Coevolving Networks: Evidences from Trade Negotiations.”
  • Gabriele Magni (UNC Department of Political Science) will present the paper, “Economic Inequality, Racialized Deservingness, and Selective Solidarity.”
  • Lucy Martin (UNC Department of Political Science) will present “All Sins are Not Created Equal: Citizens’ Preferences over Corruption Modalities.”
  • Timothy McKeown (UNC Department of Political Science) will present “The Evolution of Realist Justifications for U.S. Foreign Policy, 1861-1960.”
  • Michael Lienesch (UNC Department of Political Science) will present “Remaking Civil Religion.”
  • Tamar Malloy (UNC Department of Political Science) will present “The Three Rs: Respectability, Recognition, and Racism.”
  • Erica Johnson (UNC Curriculum in Global Studies) will lead the discussion, “Post-Communist Social Policy.”
  • Terry Sullivan (UNC Department of Political Science) will participate in “Transformations During Presidential Transitions: How Scholars Can Help.”
  • Frank Baumgartner (UNC Department of Political Science) will participate in “Get the Job: Tips for the Academic Job Market
  • Layna Mosley (UNC Department of Political Science) will participate in “International Political Economy: New Perspectives on the Politics of International Trade.”
  • Brigitte Seim (UNC Department of Public Policy) will present “Citizen Mobilization in Anti-Corruption: Evidence from Malawi.”
  • Thomas Oatley (UNC Department of Political Science) will present “The Dual Faces of Hegemony: Revisiting Hegemony Stability in a Complex Network.”
  • Candis Watts Smith (UNC Department of Public Policy) will lead the discussion, “Race and Citizenship After Ferguson.”
  • Brigitte Seim (UNC Department of Public Policy) and Daniel Pemstein (North Dakota) will present “Anchoring Vignettes and Item Response Theory in Cross-National Expert Surveys.”
  • John Stephens (UNC Department of Political Science) will lead the discussion, “Theory Meets Crisis: What Does the Eurocrisis Say to Comparative Politics?”
  • Andrea Benjamin (UNC Department of Political Science) will lead the discussion, “Structuring Disadvantage: The Family, Prisons, and the University.”
  • Kiran Auerbach (UNC Department of Political Science) will present “Party Networks and Accountability in Young Democracies: Evidence from Bosnia.”
  • Rahsaan Maxwell (UNC Department of Political Science) will present “Civic Conceptions of the Nation in an Ethnocentric Country.”
  • Rebecca Kreitzer (UNC Department of Public Policy) and Candis Watts Smith (UNC Department of Public Policy) will present “Contraception Deserts: Race, Class and Access to Affordable Family Planning.”
  • Brigitte Seim (UNC Department of Public Policy) and Ryan Steele Jablonski (London) will present “How Information, Transparency and Credit Claiming Impacts Aid Allocation.”
  • Frank Baumgartner (UNC Department of Political Science) will lead the discussion, “Assessing Congress’s Capacity to Solve Problems.”
  • Tamar Malloy (UNC Department of Political Science) will present “When Do Radical Flanks Work?: Identity- versus Affinity-based Social Movements.”
  • James Svara (UNC School of Government) will present “Teaching Public Service Ethics Using Codes of Ethics.”
  • Michael Lienesch (UNC Department of Political Science) will serve as chair for “New Theologies.”
  • Maxine Eichner (UNC School of Law) will present “Market-Cautious Feminism.”
  • Donald D. Searing (UNC Department of Political Science) and William Jacoby (Michigan State) will present “The Political Values of Politicians: Stability and Change Over Four Decades”
  • Candis Watts Smith (UNC Department of Public Policy) will lead the discussion, “Immigration and Identity: Process of Assimilation and Discrimination.”
  • Frank Baumgartner (UNC Department of Political Science) will participate in the panel, “Author Meets Critic: Patricia Strach’s Hiding Politics in Plain Sight.”
  • Susan Bickford (UNC Department of Political Science) will present “Reason’s Companions: Experiences of Knowing in Plato.”
  • Layna Mosley (UNC Department of Political Science) and Emilie Marie Hafner-Burton (UC San Diego) will present “Preferential Treatment? GSP Programs, Trade and Human Rights”
  • Eric Hansen (UNC Department of Exercise and Sport Science) and Virginia Gray (UNC Department of Political Science) will present “Interest Group Density and Policy Change in the States.”
  • Anna Bassi (UNC Department of Political Science) will present “Parties' Preferences over Policy vs Office Goals and Government Formation.”

The full conference schedule can be found on the APSA website.